Scientific Forums


Pages: (2) [1] 2   ( Go to first unread post )

Add reply Start new topic Start new poll


> Studying A Black Hole?, black hole, science fiction
MNM
Posted: May 2 2012, 05:42 PM


Newbie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 3
Joined: 30-April 12

Positive Feedback: 0%
Feedback Score: 0


Hi everyone,

Quick intro: I'm new here. When I first went to college I spent 3 years double-majoring in chemistry and physics. Even after deciding not to be a scientist, I've stayed interested in science, and recently started writing science fiction. One of my stories just got an honorable mention in the Writers of the Future contest.

For my current project, I need some help from the experts. Suppose someday we've got a warp drive or other way to travel to the stars. What aspects of black holes would be best studied by observing a black hole close-up (but at a safe distance from the event horizon)?

Looking forward to your ideas! smile.gif

Molly

This post has been edited by MNM on May 2 2012, 05:42 PM
Top
Robittybob1
Posted: May 2 2012, 07:41 PM


Advanced Member
*****

Group: Power Member
Posts: 6588
Joined: 15-October 11

Positive Feedback: 0%
Feedback Score: 0


Does your warp drive have sufficient escape velocity?

Do you realise time will slow right down, communication will be out of the question.
Top
MNM
Posted: May 2 2012, 08:41 PM


Newbie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 3
Joined: 30-April 12

Positive Feedback: 0%
Feedback Score: 0


I specified a safe distance from the event horizon. Thus, escape velocity isn't relevant.

Yes, I do realize that time slows with increasing proximity to a black hole. But again, "a safe distance from the event horizon" was intended to mean the scientists won't be close enough to the black hole for significant time problems to occur.

So ... back to my question. What sort of phenomena would scientists find easiest to study in the vicinity (but not within dangerous proximity) of a black hole?
Top
Lasand
Posted: May 2 2012, 09:09 PM


Advanced Member
*****

Group: Power Member
Posts: 731
Joined: 8-December 07

Positive Feedback: 77.78%
Feedback Score: 2


Since it's science fiction, stress the opposite. That it is brilliant around a black hole until you get through the photosphere.

http://jamesmessig.wordpress.com/2010/04/2...ge-of-eternity/


--------------------
"It's elementary, My Dear Quantum"...The Sherlock Holmes of physics.

Top
Robittybob1
Posted: May 2 2012, 09:43 PM


Advanced Member
*****

Group: Power Member
Posts: 6588
Joined: 15-October 11

Positive Feedback: 0%
Feedback Score: 0


QUOTE (MNM @ May 2 2012, 08:41 PM)
I specified a safe distance from the event horizon. Thus, escape velocity isn't relevant.

Yes, I do realize that time slows with increasing proximity to a black hole. But again, "a safe distance from the event horizon" was intended to mean the scientists won't be close enough to the black hole for significant time problems to occur.

So ... back to my question. What sort of phenomena would scientists find easiest to study in the vicinity (but not within dangerous proximity) of a black hole?

Yes but to make the story exciting you got to get in real close. Sounds a bit timid so far. How close can you get before you are at the limit? Take it to the limit.
Top
Lasand
Posted: May 2 2012, 10:11 PM


Advanced Member
*****

Group: Power Member
Posts: 731
Joined: 8-December 07

Positive Feedback: 77.78%
Feedback Score: 2


Send a team out to verify frame-dragging around a spinning black hole.

Send a team out ot see if a magnetic field exists around a spinning, charged black hole.


--------------------
"It's elementary, My Dear Quantum"...The Sherlock Holmes of physics.

Top
MNM
Posted: May 2 2012, 10:26 PM


Newbie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 3
Joined: 30-April 12

Positive Feedback: 0%
Feedback Score: 0


QUOTE (Lasand @ May 2 2012, 10:11 PM)
Send a team out to verify frame-dragging around a spinning black hole.

Send a team out ot see if a magnetic field exists around a spinning, charged black hole.

Excellent! These are the sort of suggestions I'm looking for. smile.gif

Any other ideas, please don't hesitate to mention them. I'd like to consider the options a bit, before writing the story.

Thanks!
Molly
Top
sparhawk
Posted: May 3 2012, 02:11 PM


Newbie
*

Group: Power Member
Posts: 12
Joined: 3-May 12

Positive Feedback: 0%
Feedback Score: 0


They could also investigate the jet, maybe getting (to) close to it.
Top
flyingbuttressman
Posted: May 3 2012, 03:16 PM


noblesse oblige / nullius in verba
*****

Group: Power Member
Posts: 5918
Joined: 8-June 09

Positive Feedback: 68.66%
Feedback Score: 166


Investigate them as a potential source of Gamma Ray Bursts. One of the theoretical sources of such events are stars in the act of falling into a black hole. That might be a bit dangerous though, as an actual Gamma Ray Burst in the vicinity could vaporize your entire ship with gamma radiation.
Top
Ed Wood
Posted: May 3 2012, 04:09 PM


Advanced Member
*****

Group: Power Member
Posts: 948
Joined: 12-September 06

Positive Feedback: 25%
Feedback Score: -14


Gravitational lensing would be an interesting phenomenon to see 'up close'

With probes one could set 2 objects in orbit and fire lasers back and forth to measure the extent the light bends (follows space time around the event horizon) and determine the point of no return or complete circumference.

Multi wavelength light should not separate into different wavelengths unlike water.

Another interesting test would be the effects of frame dragging i.e Gravity probe b

or

Thrilling an effect of frame dragging i.e. Saturn rings have wave patterns within them.

With probes one could test the extent and gradient of time shift due to gravitation relative to the event horizon

You can Google most of this stuff there is a lot of good info out there.

I can post some links if you'd like.


One thing to keep in mind is that if one gets too close one dies and it is difficult to tell how close is too close due to the time slowing issues redshift could be a possible way to track this.

Also this black hole should be relatively free of nearby mass as objects falling into it can cause massive outbursts of gamma and other radiation.
Top
Whitewolf4869
Posted: May 3 2012, 05:29 PM


Advanced Member
*****

Group: Power Member
Posts: 346
Joined: 18-March 12

Positive Feedback: 0%
Feedback Score: 0


QUOTE (Ed Wood @ May 3 2012, 04:09 PM)
Gravitational lensing would be an interesting phenomenon to see 'up close'

With probes one could set 2 objects in orbit and fire lasers back and forth to measure the extent the light bends (follows space time around the event horizon) and determine the point of no return or complete circumference.

Multi wavelength light should not separate into different wavelengths unlike water.

Another interesting test would be the effects of frame dragging i.e Gravity probe b

or

Thrilling an effect of frame dragging i.e. Saturn rings have wave patterns within them.

With probes one could test the extent and gradient of time shift due to gravitation relative to the event horizon

You can Google most of this stuff there is a lot of good info out there.

I can post some links if you'd like.


One thing to keep in mind is that if one gets too close one dies and it is difficult to tell how close is too close due to the time slowing issues redshift could be a possible way to track this.

Also this black hole should be relatively free of nearby mass as objects falling into it can cause massive outbursts of gamma and other radiation.

Blah blah blah blink.gif


--------------------
Flyingbuttressman
A pillar in the house of GOD
White wolf has spoken!
Top
Ed Wood
Posted: May 4 2012, 02:51 AM


Advanced Member
*****

Group: Power Member
Posts: 948
Joined: 12-September 06

Positive Feedback: 25%
Feedback Score: -14


QUOTE (Whitewolf4869 @ May 3 2012, 05:29 PM)
Blah blah blah blink.gif

halb halb halB
Top
Mazulu
Posted: May 4 2012, 06:35 AM


Advanced Member
*****

Group: Power Member
Posts: 1641
Joined: 30-December 10

Positive Feedback: 57.14%
Feedback Score: -13


QUOTE (MNM @ May 2 2012, 10:26 PM)
Excellent!  These are the sort of suggestions I'm looking for.  smile.gif

Any other ideas, please don't hesitate to mention them.  I'd like to consider the options a bit, before writing the story.

Thanks!
Molly

Your spaceship could take pictures of the debris field orbiting the black hole, and eventually falling into it. The ship sensors could detect the gamma rays from matter as it is ripped apart at the event horizon.


--------------------
X-rays are a hoax.
-Lord Kelvin, engineer and physicist (c. 1900)

In a Zero-Energy Universe, gravity is the loophole to conservation of energy. So take all the energy you want. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zero-energy_universe

Super-string theory has not been experimentally verified.

Atheism is one of evolution's mistakes.
Top
Ed Wood
Posted: May 5 2012, 03:44 PM


Advanced Member
*****

Group: Power Member
Posts: 948
Joined: 12-September 06

Positive Feedback: 25%
Feedback Score: -14


just for Sci-Fi fun and humor you could write about future echoes in a gravitational field.

Red Dwarf
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JGVuZAI0cTc


If it is a horror story you could really twist an jerk the occupants of the ship mentally. Could be entertaining.
Top
waitedavid137
Posted: May 5 2012, 04:29 PM


Advanced Member
*****

Group: Power Member
Posts: 2263
Joined: 17-June 10

Positive Feedback: 100%
Feedback Score: 5


QUOTE (MNM @ May 2 2012, 10:42 AM)
Hi everyone,

Quick intro: I'm new here. When I first went to college I spent 3 years double-majoring in chemistry and physics. Even after deciding not to be a scientist, I've stayed interested in science, and recently started writing science fiction. One of my stories just got an honorable mention in the Writers of the Future contest.

For my current project, I need some help from the experts. Suppose someday we've got a warp drive or other way to travel to the stars. What aspects of black holes would be best studied by observing a black hole close-up (but at a safe distance from the event horizon)?

Looking forward to your ideas! smile.gif

Molly

Since you have a warp drive why not fly in and out of one? See whether the other external regions actually exist and whether they lead to ours or other universes.
Top

Topic Options Pages: (2) [1] 2 

Add reply Start new topic Start new poll


 

Terms of use