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> What Is Biochemistry?
MagentoC
Posted: Apr 5 2012, 05:59 AM


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What is biochemistry?Can anyone explain about it?


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Robittybob1
Posted: Apr 5 2012, 06:13 AM


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QUOTE (MagentoC @ Apr 5 2012, 05:59 AM)
What is biochemistry?Can anyone explain about it?

bio = life; so it is the chemistry of living things.
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Lady Elizabeth
Posted: Apr 9 2012, 06:47 PM


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Biochemistry is very cool;- use nature to make stereo-specific molecules without all that rascemic jazz ..... great for clean one peak chromatograms.

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LostInPhysics
Posted: Apr 11 2012, 05:44 PM


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Biochemistry deals with the chemical reactions and environments that exist and occur within biological systems. For example, the Krebs cycle in respiration, or the uptake of oxygen by the conversion of haemoglobin into oxyhaemoglobin in the blood stream


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No sir i don't have a degree in physics, but i also don't have all the pre-concieved biases and mistakes of our forefathers to clutter my mind!
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Darian
Posted: Apr 20 2012, 03:00 PM


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QUOTE (LostInPhysics @ Apr 11 2012, 05:44 PM)
Biochemistry deals with the chemical reactions and environments that exist and occur within biological systems. For example, the Krebs cycle in respiration, or the uptake of oxygen by the conversion of haemoglobin into oxyhaemoglobin in the blood stream

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bharatbuk
Posted: Nov 23 2012, 11:52 AM


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Biochemistry is the great combination of biology with organic,Inorganic chemistry.It helps to study how living things obtain energy from food,the chemical basis of heredity,and fundamental changes occur in disease.Application of Biochemistry includes pharmacology,microbiology,physiology and clinical chemistry..
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MDT
Posted: Nov 23 2012, 01:32 PM


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Organic chemistry is concerned with the chemistry of carbon and carbon based compounds. The ability of carbon to form up to four covalent bonds, with itself and other atoms, allows C to form nearly endless variations.

Bio-chemistry is a subset of organic chemistry and deals with the carbon compounds specific to life and life processes.

There are other areas of organic chemistry, which are not considered biochemistry, such as making benzene, TNT and other compounds poison to life. It can also include synthetic polymers like polyethylene, epoxies, etc.

Under existing environmental laws, VOC or volatile organic compounds tend to fixate on carbon compounds not formed by nature via bio-chemistry, such as paint thinner, glycol, acetone, etc. They tend to ignore most life based volatile organic compounds like the organic emissions from cooking foods during the holidays. Or the fragrance from owning flowers.

An interesting carbon exception is CO2 or carbon dioxide. It contains carbon but is not considered organic carbon, but inorganic carbon. CO2 is one step off place where carbon become part of inorganic chemistry.
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AJKOER
Posted: Apr 12 2013, 12:57 AM


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Actual Biochemistry is not a great combination of biology with organic, Inorganic chemistry, study of catalysis and dilute aqueous reactions. It is an incredibly difficult combination of all of the above.

In good faith, I would recommend going in to Biochemistry only after you have mastered biology, Inorganic chemistry, study of catalysis and dilute aqueous reactions,.... And, even then, you will have a learning curve.

I am also, to be honest, fearful of publishing break throughs as while they could save lives, some evil government may asks its sciencists to use the knowledge to bio-engineer weapons of major destruction. A problematic science for me.
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Capracus
Posted: May 21 2013, 11:34 AM


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Newly Discovered Molecule Could Deliver Drugs to Treat Diseases
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Kansas State University researchers have discovered a molecule that may be capable of delivering drugs inside the body to treat diseases.

For the first time, researchers have designed and created a membrane-bounded vesicle formed entirely of peptides -- molecules made up of amino acids, the building blocks of protein. The membrane could serve as a new drug delivery system to safely treat cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.

A study led by John Tomich, professor of biochemistry at Kansas State University, has been published in the journal PLOS ONE in September, and a patent for the discovery is pending.

The peptides are a set of self-assembling branched molecules made up of naturally occurring amino acids. The chemical properties of a peptide create a vesicle that Tomich describes as a bubble: It's made up of a thin membrane and is hollow inside. Created in a water solution, the bubble is filled with water rather than air.

The peptides -- or bubbles -- can be made in a solution containing a drug or other molecule that becomes encapsulated as the peptide assembles, yielding a trapped compound, much like a gelatin capsule holds over-the-counter oral remedies. The peptide vesicles could be delivered to appropriate cells in the body to treat diseases and minimize potential side effects.

"We see this as a new way to deliver any kind of molecule to cells," Tomich said. "We know that in certain diseases subpopulations of cells have gone awry, and we'd like to be able to specifically target them instead of attacking every cell, including healthy ones."

The finding could improve gene therapy, which has the potential to cure diseases by replacing diseased cells with healthy ones. Gene therapy is being tested in clinical trials, but the biggest challenge is how best to deliver the genes.

Methods include cells with a virus being injected into the body, and liposomes -- fatty compounds -- carrying the genes. However, these methods may present some problems.

When a virus is used, the body's immune system can attack the virus or cause a tumor. Lipid-based systems may cause inflammation and may not properly bind to cells.

The peptides created by Kansas State University researchers have advantages over their lipid counterparts. The peptides have improved stability and durability, are easier and quicker to create, and they could be delivered to a specific area in the body.

The peptides can be designed to have the ability to target cells, tissues, tumors or organs, and to encapsulate chemical reagents, antibodies, toxins and inhibitors, Tomich said.

"We don't even begin to know all of the potential applications for this discovery," he said. "We envision that many products could be packaged and delivered using these peptides."

Partial funding for the study came from the Kansas State University Johnson Cancer Research Center, National Institutes of Health and Japan Society for the Promotion of Science.

Kansas State University collaborators include Sushanth Gudlur, May 2012 doctoral graduate in biochemistry, who first published the results in a dissertation; Pinakin Sukthankar, doctoral student in biochemistry; Jian Gao, former postdoctoral fellow in the department of biochemistry; Luz Adriana Avila Flores, graduate research assistant in the department of biochemistry; Yasuaki Hiromasa, research assistant professor of biochemistry; and Jianhan Chen, assistant professor of biochemistry. Takeo Iwamoto from the Jikei University School of Medicine in Japan also was a collaborator.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/...20924142613.htm
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Capracus
Posted: May 21 2013, 11:39 AM


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Biochemists Discover New Mechanism in Ribosome Formation: Protein Controls Synchronized Transport of Ribosome Factors
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A new mechanism in the formation of ribosomes has been discovered by researchers from the Heidelberg University Biochemistry Center. In an interdisciplinary approach, the Heidelberg scientists, along with colleagues from Switzerland and Japan, describe a heretofore uncharacterised protein that plays a specific role in ribosome assembly in eukaryotes, organisms whose cells contain a cell nucleus. This protein makes sure that specific factors required for ribosome synthesis are transported together, like hitchhikers, into the nucleus to the site of assembly.

The results of this research were published in Science.

Ribosomes, the protein factories of the cell, are macromolecular complexes of ribonucleic acids (RNA) and ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) that are organised in a highly complicated three-dimensional nanostructure. Correct synthesis of ribosomes is critical for the division of all cells and is a process that follows strict rules. In eukaryotes, new ribosomes are formed predominantly in the cell nucleus. Therefore, the r-proteins needed for ribosome formation must travel from the cytoplasm of the cell to a site in the nucleus where the ribosomes are assembled. Until recently it was not clear whether r-proteins that have a similar function and form functional clusters on the ribosome structure are also co-transported into the nucleus.
The researchers have now found a protein that coordinates the co-transport of certain r-proteins in functional clusters into the cell nucleus. This factor is called Symportin1, for synchronised import. "Symportin1 synchronises the import of both the Rpl5 and Rpl11 r-proteins into the cell nucleus and supports their integration into the growing ribosome structure," explains Prof. Dr. Irmgard Sinning of the Heidelberg University Biochemistry Center (BZH). "It employs a familiar logistical concept from every day life, like picking up a hitchhiker or sharing a taxi with someone headed for the same destination," says Dr. Gert Bange of the BZH, lead author of the study together with Dr. Dieter Kressler (now of Fribourg University).
The researchers from Heidelberg University and the University of Fribourg (Switzerland) collaborated closely with colleagues from Osaka University in Japan on the research. "The combination of different methods ranging from traditional cell biology to new biophysical approaches was crucial in developing the detailed picture of this previously unknown biological mechanism," emphasises Prof. Dr. Ed Hurt, also of the BZH. The study took advantage of the Biochemistry Center's crystallisation platform and the research received support from the Cluster of Excellence "CellNetworks" of Heidelberg University.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/...21102084643.htm

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joelcarmel
Posted: Jun 3 2013, 08:59 AM


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1. The branch of science concerned with the chemical and physicochemical processes that occur within living organisms.
2. Processes of this kind.


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Joel
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joelcarmel
Posted: Jun 6 2013, 09:42 AM


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The branch of science concerned with the chemical and physicochemical processes that occur within living organisms.

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qamaths01
Posted: Jun 12 2013, 09:07 AM


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Bio chemistry is the combination of Biology and Chemistry. So it can be explained as the chemical procedures done with the help of biological entity.
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Lady Elizabeth
Posted: Jun 14 2013, 05:13 PM


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QUOTE (MagentoC @ Apr 5 2012, 05:59 AM)
What is biochemistry?

blink.gif .... totally on par with "who invented Stephenson's Rocket?" - dear, oh dear.


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PSYCHOANALITIKAS
  Posted: Jun 24 2013, 10:50 AM


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dry.gif BIOCHEMISTRY IS GENETICAL REASON, ON THE PROOF.. TO BE STUDY BIOCHEMISTRY, TO BE NYC, ON THE BRAIN...;P
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