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> The Natural Theory Of Space Quantum, An "on the edge" Theory without "time"
norgeboy
Posted: Apr 3 2012, 11:08 PM


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Corrected Appendix G = density of matter and black holes:

mass = K x radius in fact.

_____________________

Density of Matter and Black Holes

As the intersection of one dimensional space (a line) with two dimensional space (a surface) is a single point with zero dimension, the intersection of two and three dimensional space is a line with one dimension, and the intersection of three and five dimensional space should be a surface with two dimensions, then the intersection between five and eight dimensional space should be three-dimensional (observable in 3-dimensions) and is suggested by the spherical volume of a black hole.

From Appendix E, the maximum allowed energy-event is 2.700E+25 J.

Then E-sub-B at a black hole surface should be bounded by the maximum allowed c^3 J kg^-1.

For the hole surface:

EBmax = GmHrH / rH^2 or E-sub-Bmax = G x m / r for the hole, and

c^3 = G x m / r relating to the hole, or we can write

mH / rH ≤ c3 / G

or

mH ≤ rH c^3 / G

where G = 6.673E-11 met^3 kg^-1 sec^-2,
r-sub-H has units meters, and
c (3E+8 numerical) has units J^1/3.

Then c^3 / G ≤ 2.700E+25 / 6.673E-11, and

mH / rH ≤ 4.046E+35 kg met^-1

for any black hole.

If we let E-sub-B = ρ E-sub-Bmax = ρ c^3 where 0 < ρ ≤ 1, and

ρ = nb where 1 ≤ n ≤ 1/b = B, then

mH = rH ρ c^3 / G or

mH = KG rH where KG = ρ c^3 / G.
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norgeboy
Posted: Apr 3 2012, 11:21 PM


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I also left one sentence out of E, the corrected E is attached.

0 <= energy event <= c/b = c^3 numerically FYI.
______________________

Appendix E

The Nature and Meaning of Quantum Mechanics

We postulate that any allowed energy quanta has a wavelength λ = nb where n is an integer and b = 1.111… E-17 meters per the main text.

For example, the 13.6eV H ground state transition is λ = 91.2nm

And n = λ / b = 8208820882 + Δn where Δn is the integer adjustment for the repeating decimal 1.111….

Similarly, the H state 1 to state 2 transition is λ = 121.6nm

And n = 10945094509 + Δn.

An H state 3 to state 1 transition is λ = 486.1nm and n = 43753375338 + Δn and so on.

Then 0 ≤ one energy-event ≤ c / b ( = 2.700E25 J)

and quantum energy = hc/λ is defined as an integral operation of 1/b.

Then the base of all quantum mechanics is 1/b = B where t = cB.

Q.E.D.
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norgeboy
Posted: Apr 6 2012, 04:45 AM


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Adding this here also regarding black holes.
______________________

Appendix H

The Spatial Nature of Black Holes

Per Appendix G,

mH / rH = KG or m-sub-H = K-sub-G x r-sub-H

where KG = λ c^3 / G.

The following surface density boundary conditions should apply for any black hole:

The hole mass m-sub-H / (surface-“area”) of the 3-dimensional 2-D surface = m-sub-H / (surface-“area”) of the 5-dimensional 3-D surface.

Similarly, mH / (4/3 x π x rH^3) = LT x rH^5 where L-sub-T defines the 5-dimensional “surface-area” for 8-dimensional space.

Then boundary conditions require:

πrH^2 = LT3-8 x rH^5 and 4/3 πrH^3 = LT5-8 x rH^5

where LT = L-sub-T = fn(LT3-8, LT5-8) = fn( ∫∫∫∫∫∫∫∫dV8, ∫∫∫∫∫dV5, ∫∫∫dV3, ∫∫dV2, ∫dx)

and r-sub-H = rH = 3LT5-8 / 4LT3-8 from boundary conditions.

Then λ = (4 x L-subT3-8) / (3 x L-sub-T5-8) or

λ = 4LT3-8 / 3LT5-8.

Then λ represents the state of transition from 0 to 1 from 3-dimensions to 8-dimensions for the spatial intersection known as a black hole.

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StayOpen42
Posted: Apr 7 2012, 08:06 PM


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I just wanna say guys this is awesome i've theorized like everything you've talked about i've just never had the place to learn the math and work it all out and i havn't had time to research so thanks for posting all this so i don't feel crazy lol! i'm not the only one laugh.gif
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Confused1
Posted: Apr 8 2012, 12:12 AM


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I like to think I'm not naturally vicious BUT am I the only one thinking
Ego + ((1/2)wit)^4 = 0
?


--------------------
Clarity begins at home.
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brucep
Posted: Apr 8 2012, 12:24 AM


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QUOTE (Confused1 @ Apr 8 2012, 12:12 AM)
I like to think I'm not naturally vicious BUT am I the only one thinking
Ego + ((1/2)wit)^4 = 0
?

You referring to the numerologist?
Send PM ·
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norgeboy
Posted: Apr 8 2012, 12:38 AM


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Very funny. I love you guys.

Let's face it, I have now accurately:

1. Derived Plank's constant h.
2. Derived the linear mass-radius relationship for black holes.
3. Defined the base of quantum mechanics.

I know it sounds weird, but it is mathematically indisputable.

Newest and attached: delta-lambda = c-sub-3 / c-sub-5 is the ratio of curvatures around mass.

Why do you continue to disbelieve?
_______________________

Appendix H

The Spatial Nature of Black Holes

Per Appendix G,

mH / rH = KG or m-sub-H = K-sub-G x r-sub-H

where KG = Δλ c^3 / G.

The following surface density boundary conditions should apply for any black hole:

1. The hole mass m-sub-H / (“surface-area”) of the 3-dimensional 2-D surface = m-sub-H / (“surface-area”) of the 5-dimensional 3-D surface (volume.)
2. Similarly, mH / (4/3 x π x rH^3) = CR x rH^5 where C-sub-R defines the 5-dimensional “surface-area” for 8-dimensional space.

Then boundary conditions require:

4 /3 (πrH^3) / rH = CR3-8 x rH^5 and 4/3 πrH^3 = CR5-8 x rH^5

where CR n-m = C-sub-R for dimension n curving through dimension m

and r-sub-H = rH = CR5-8 / CR3-8 from boundary conditions.

Then Δλ = C-sub-R3-8 / C-sub-R5-8 or

Δλ = CR3 / CR5

where C-sub-R3 and C-sub-R5 represent the curvature rates of 3 and 5 dimensional space respectively through 8-dimensional space, where the ratio mH / rH is proportional to Δλ, and where we assume C-sub-R3 ≤ C-sub-R5.

Then there is only an effective zero-density “black hole” for CR3 ~ 0 while the highest density black hole occurs where CR3 = CR5,

Then Δλ represents the ratio of curvatures of 3 and 5 dimensional space through 8 dimensions for the spatial intersections known as black holes.

The higher the mass density in a spatial location, the more the effective radius of curvature should change. With dense enough matter, then curvatures among dimensions become more closely equivalent as density becomes large.

To visualize in two dimensions, πr^2 and 4/3 πr^3 / r = 4/3 πr^2 are both two dimensional surfaces that curve in 3-dimensions. The curvature (lack of) for a flat circle is 0 while the curvature for the closed spherical surface is 1.

This post has been edited by norgeboy on Apr 8 2012, 01:27 AM
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norgeboy
Posted: Apr 8 2012, 03:20 AM


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and I think,

Appendix H (cont.)

If we set CRn = Cn x e-sub-n where n = Fibonacci dimension n, then per Appendix C

λ ~ 10^-5 for common black holes.

my guess is many black holes should have the "density" m/r ~ 10^+30 to be corrected if wrong, thanks.

This post has been edited by norgeboy on Apr 8 2012, 03:23 AM
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norgeboy
Posted: Apr 9 2012, 12:25 AM


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QUOTE (norgeboy @ Apr 8 2012, 03:20 AM)
and I think,

Appendix H (cont.)

If we set CRn = Cn x e-sub-n where n = Fibonacci dimension n, then per Appendix C

λ ~ 10^-5 for common black holes.

my guess is many black holes should have the "density" m/r ~ 10^+30 to be corrected if wrong, thanks.

Please ignore the last post.

I have now calculated the minimum lambda to be ~ 10^-7 so that the minimum mass/radius for black holes (in 3-dimensions) should be ~ 10^28 or so.

Also, the surface area of a sphere is 4-pi-r^2... I meant to write 4/3 pi r^3 /(r/3)...

always watch my math(!)

__________________________________

Appendix H

The Spatial Nature of Black Holes

Per Appendix G,

mH / rH = KG or m-sub-H = K-sub-G x r-sub-H

where KG = Δλ c^3 / G.

The following surface density boundary conditions should apply for any black hole:

1. The hole mass m-sub-H / (“surface-area”) of the 3-dimensional 2-D surface = m-sub-H / (“surface-area”) of the 5-dimensional 3-D surface (volume.)
2. Similarly, mH / (4/3 x π x rH^3) = CR x rH^5 where C-sub-R defines the 5-dimensional “surface-area” for 8-dimensional space.

Then boundary conditions require:

4πrH^2 = CR3-8 x rH^5 and 4/3 πrH^3 = CR5-8 x rH^5

where CR n-m = C-sub-R for dimension n curving through dimension m

and r-sub-H = rH = CR5-8 / CR3-8 from boundary conditions.

Then Δλ = C-sub-R3-8 / C-sub-R5-8 or

Δλ = CR3 / CR5

where C-sub-R3 and C-sub-R5 represent the curvature rates of 3 and 5 dimensional space respectively through 8-dimensional space, where the ratio mH / rH is proportional to Δλ, and where we assume C-sub-R3 ≤ C-sub-R5.

Then there is only an effective zero-density “black hole” for CR3 ~ 0 while the highest density black hole occurs where CR3 = CR5,

Then Δλ represents the ratio of curvatures of 3 and 5 dimensional space through 8 dimensions for the spatial intersections known as black holes.

The higher the mass density in a spatial location, the more the effective radius of curvature should change. With dense enough matter, then curvatures among dimensions become more closely equivalent as density becomes large.

To visualize in two dimensions, πr^2 and 4πr^2 are both two dimensional surfaces that curve in 3-dimensions. The curvature (lack of) for a flat circle is 0 while the curvature for the closed spherical surface is 1.
Appendix H (cont.)

If we assume C-sub-R5 is closed (curvature 1) in 8-dimensions, then C-sub-R3 has the possible range 0  1 in 8-dimensions where 0 represents no intersection at all and 1 represents infinite intersections.

To see/observe the intersection (black hole) it must be at least a 5 and 8 dimensional intersection.

Then the “smallest” black hole is the “least dense mH / rH” black hole having Δλ ~ 0 but still large enough to represent an intersection of 5 and 8 dimensional space.

Among other conditions, the boundary condition “inside” the 3-dimensional hole:

MH / V5 = MH / V8

where V-sub-5 and V-sub-8 are defined by Appendix C.

Then the least dense black holes are functions of e8 and e5 and should conform to

Δλ = V-sub-5 / V-sub-8, or

Δλ ≥ ~ 10^-7 for any observable (3-dimensional) black hole.





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norgeboy
Posted: Apr 9 2012, 09:26 PM


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Here is the anticipated correction for lambda (min) and should agree with the so-called "event horizons of known black holes.
_______________________________
Appendix H

The Spatial Nature of Black Holes

Per Appendix G,

mH / rH = KG or m-sub-H = K-sub-G x r-sub-H

where KG = Δλ c^3 / G.

The following surface density boundary conditions should apply for any black hole:

1. The hole mass m-sub-H / (“surface-area”) of the 3-dimensional 2-D surface = m-sub-H / (“surface-area”) of the 5-dimensional 3-D surface (volume.)
2. Similarly, mH / (4/3 x π x rH^3) = CR x rH^5 where C-sub-R defines the 5-dimensional “surface-area” for 8-dimensional space.

Then boundary conditions require:

4πrH^2 = CR3-8 x rH^5 and 4/3 πrH^3 = CR5-8 x rH^5

where CR n-m = C-sub-R for dimension n curving through dimension m

and r-sub-H = rH = CR5-8 / CR3-8 from boundary conditions.

Then Δλ = C-sub-R3-8 / C-sub-R5-8 or

Δλ = CR3 / CR5

where C-sub-R3 and C-sub-R5 represent the curvature rates of 3 and 5 dimensional space respectively through 8-dimensional space, where the ratio mH / rH is proportional to Δλ, and where we assume C-sub-R3 ≤ C-sub-R5.

Then there is only an effective zero-density “black hole” for CR3 ~ 0 while the highest density black hole occurs where CR3 = CR5,

Then Δλ represents the ratio of curvatures of 3 and 5 dimensional space through 8 dimensions for the spatial intersections known as black holes.

The higher the mass density in a spatial location, the more the effective radius of curvature should change. With dense enough matter, then curvatures among dimensions become more closely equivalent as density becomes large.

To visualize in two dimensions, πr^2 and 4πr^2 are both two dimensional surfaces that curve in 3-dimensions. The curvature (lack of) for a flat circle is 0 while the curvature for the closed spherical surface is 1.
Appendix H (cont.)

If we assume C-sub-R5 is closed (curvature 1) in 8-dimensions, then C-sub-R3 has the possible range 0  1 in 8-dimensions where 0 represents no intersection at all and 1 represents infinite intersections.

To see/observe the intersection (black hole) it must be at least a 5 and 8 dimensional intersection.

Then the “smallest” black hole is the “least dense mH / rH” black hole having Δλ ~ 0 but still large enough to represent an intersection of 5 and 8 dimensional space.

Then the boundary condition is a single event:

CR3min = 1 / cB where B = 1 and

Δλmin = 1 meter / c meters = 3.333E-9.

This post has been edited by norgeboy on Apr 9 2012, 09:44 PM
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norgeboy
Posted: Apr 9 2012, 11:14 PM


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Or here is a more accepted way to say it:

...

Appendix H (cont.)

If we assume C-sub-R5 is closed (curvature 1) in 8-dimensions, then C-sub-R3 has the possible range 0  1 in 8-dimensions where 0 represents no intersection at all and 1 represents infinite intersections.

To see/observe the intersection (black hole) it must be at least a 5 and 8 dimensional intersection.

Then the “smallest” black hole is the “least dense mH / rH” black hole having Δλ ~ 0 but still large enough to represent an intersection of 5 and 8 dimensional space.

Then the boundary condition is a single event:

CR3min = 1 / cB where B = 1 and

Δλmin = 1 meter / c meters = 3.333E-9.

Then

c2 / G ≤ mH / rH ≤ c3 / G or

c^2 ≤ mH / rH ≤ c^3 kg met^-1

or we can write the expression

rH = K(λ) mH G / c^2 meters



This post has been edited by norgeboy on Apr 9 2012, 11:18 PM
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norgeboy
Posted: Apr 10 2012, 10:44 PM


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This is about curvatures as in the black hole discussion:

Appendix K

The Various Sizes of Black Holes and Curvatures of Three-Dimensional Space

Appendix H defines the mass-radius relationship as observed in three-dimensional space:

mH / rH = KG(λ)

where λ = Δλ = CR3 / CR5

and represents the ratio of curvatures from 3-dimensional space and 5-dimensional space through 8-dimensional space respectively.

We assume, for the three dimensional intersections, that CR5 = 1.

The minimum CR3 = 1 / c and the maximum CR3 = c / c = 1.

Allowed quantum are then n / c for n = 1 to c.

The minimum (least dense) intersection is an intersection among 3, 5 and 8 dimensional space where CR5 = 1 and CR3 = CR3(min) = 1 / c.

The next “largest” (more dense) intersection should occur for CR3 = 2 / c and so on.

The most dense intersection occurs where CR3 = c / c = 1 and represent a closed third dimension in both eight dimensional and five dimensional space.

To visualize curvatures, the diameter of a circle = d is a straight line with curvature
CR1-3 = 0 while the circumference (length πd) closes upon itself (runs into the back of itself) and has the curvature CR1-3 = 1.

The curvature CR2-3 is closed in 3-dimensions visualized as a spherical (or elliptical, not reviewed in this scope) surface area that has closed itself around a center-of-mass cM.

The two dimensional surface does not alter or “grow” in three dimensions, but the one dimensional line, e.g. the straight path of a distant comet or ray of light (CR1-3 = 0) or the line of a planetary satellite CR1-3 = 1) both curve (or bend) around mass in three dimensions to the two extreme degrees of curvature.

Then the ratio mH / rH = KG should represent a curvature of three-dimensional space through eight-dimensional space.

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Mekigal
Posted: Apr 10 2012, 10:59 PM


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QUOTE (Confused1 @ Apr 8 2012, 12:12 AM)
I like to think I'm not naturally vicious BUT am I the only one thinking
Ego + ((1/2)wit)^4 = 0
?

thats funny
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norgeboy
Posted: Apr 12 2012, 01:17 AM


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What would happen if we took a GE turbine (like at the Hoover dam) and placed it into geo-sync or any other orbit around the Earth. It would be weightless.

If it got spinning from a solar panel energy, would it provide more energy than from the waterfall at the Hoover dam?

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Robittybob1
Posted: Apr 12 2012, 01:35 AM


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QUOTE (norgeboy @ Apr 12 2012, 01:17 AM)
What would happen if we took a GE turbine (like at the Hoover dam) and placed it into geo-sync or any other orbit around the Earth. It would be weightless.

If it got spinning from a solar panel energy, would it provide more energy than from the waterfall at the Hoover dam?

Are you being serious? If you could get power from it, say from the Solar Wind it would soon get a very elliptical orbit and shortly thereafter crash back to the Earth.
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