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> Cancer Therapy, Without Side Effects Nearing Trials
ontheleft
Posted: Apr 4 2013, 03:59 AM


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Here is some hopeful nano.

QUOTE
The physical properties of boron made Hawthorne's technique possible. A particular form of boron will split when it captures a neutron and release lithium, helium and energy. Like pool balls careening around a billiards table, the helium and lithium atoms penetrate the cancer cell and destroy it from the inside without harming the surrounding tissues.
"A wide variety of cancers can be attacked with our BNCT technique," Hawthorne said. "The technique worked excellently in mice. We are ready to move on to trials in larger animals, then people. However, before we can start treating humans, we will need to build suitable equipment and facilities. When it is built, MU will have the first radiation therapy of this kind in the world."
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Capracus
Posted: May 22 2013, 02:12 AM


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Only xtrmn8r never made the above quote on Apr 14 2008 @ 11:50 PM. What motive would the above poster have for misrepresenting this forum's history?
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Guest
Posted: May 22 2013, 02:23 AM


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Thanks, Capracus. X has been off-grid for more than two years, but you're right.

I miss the guy.


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El_Machinae
Posted: May 27 2013, 12:21 PM


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QUOTE (ontheleft @ Apr 4 2013, 03:59 AM)
Here is some hopeful nano.



Treatment

It's the targeting of the poisons to the proper (cancerous) cells that seems to be the biggest hurdle.


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ontheleft
Posted: Jun 5 2013, 03:59 AM


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QUOTE (El_Machinae @ May 27 2013, 12:21 PM)
It's the targeting of the poisons to the proper (cancerous) cells that seems to be the biggest hurdle.

That article came out on April of this year as if it was news. After you posted this I checked for current news on it. What I found was trial applications for that therapy going back to 2011 but no results of any outcome.

Two years should have provided some results.

Maybe Science Daily should be called Science Anciently.
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El_Machinae
Posted: Jun 5 2013, 08:06 PM


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You'd be surprised. Two years is not enough time to report on a clinical trial. It takes oodles of time to collect the data, do biochemical analysis, and prepare a peer-reviewed paper. This is especially true with human data.


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ontheleft
Posted: Jun 8 2013, 02:20 AM


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Here, you may have more access to things.

One of

If that's not enough, enjoy this page.

The rest

Any hope would have shone up by now, don't you think?

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